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Near By Attraction

Attraction To Be Remembered

The capital of our country Delhi is steeped in historical value. The cultural monuments that dot the city are all must visit for anybody whi visits this iconic city. Despite being such a cosmopolitan environment, a visit to any of these historical icons will take you back to the time to the Mughals.

Lal Quila

The Red Fort is a historical fort in the city of Delhi in India. A UNESCO World Heritage Site

It was the main residence of the emperors of the Mughal dynasty for nearly 200 years, until 1857. It is located in the center of Delhi and houses a number of museums.

Hamayun Tomb

Humayun's tomb is the tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun in Delhi, India. The tomb was commissioned by Humayun's first wife and chief consort, Empress Bega Begum, in 1569-70, and designed by Mirak Mirza Ghiyas, a Persian architect chosen by her.

Several monuments dot the pathway leading up to the tomb enclosure from the main entrance in the West. Prominent among them is one that pre-dates the main tomb itself, by twenty years.

Nizamuddin Dargah

Hazrat Nizamuddin Dargah is the Dargah (mausoleum) of one of the world's most famous Sufi saints, Hazrat Khwaja Syed Nizamuddin Auliya (1238 - 1325 CE). Situated in the Hazrat Nizamuddin West area of Delhi, the Dargah is visited by thousands of Muslims every week, and sees a fair share of Hindus, Christians and people from other religions. The tombs of poet Hazrat Amir Khusro and Mughal princess Jehan Ara Begum are also located within the Hazrat Nizamuddin Dargah complex, and Inayat Khan's tomb is just around the corner.

Cannought Place

Connaught Place is one of the largest financial, commercial and business centres in New Delhi, India. It is often abbreviated to CP and houses the headquarters of several noted Indian firms. The main commercial area of the new city, New Delhi, during the erstwhile British Raj, its environs occupy a place of pride in the city and are counted among the top heritage structures in New Delhi. It was developed as a showpiece of Lutyens' Delhi with a prominent Central Business District.

Jantar Mantar

Jantar Mantar is located in the modern city of New Delhi. It consists of 13 architectural astronomy instruments. The site is one of five built by Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur, from 1723 onwards, as he was given by Mughal emperor Muhammad Shah the task of revising the calendar and astronomical tables. There is a plaque fixed on one of the structures in the Jantar Mantar observatory in New Delhi that was placed there in 1910 mistakenly dating the construction of the complex to the year 1710. Later research, though, suggests 1724 as the actual year of construction.

The primary purpose of the observatory was to compile astronomical tables, and to predict the times and movements of the sun, moon and planets. Some of these purposes nowadays would be classified as astronomy.